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July 1, 2014
humanoidhistory:

DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE—CHEMISTRY. 1893 illustration by Louis Loeb for Century Magazine. (New York Public Library)

humanoidhistory:

DEPARTMENT OF DOMESTIC SCIENCE—CHEMISTRY. 1893 illustration by Louis Loeb for Century Magazine. (New York Public Library)

(via scientificillustration)

8:04am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZV9u2y1KFolDr
  
Filed under: science 
June 27, 2014

Hey Bro, you ever slap a Higgs field hard enough pop out a particle?

June 26, 2014

jtotheizzoe:

Richard Feynman discusses why there is a difference between the past and the future, in this clip from his legendary 1964 lecture series at Cornell: The Character of Physical Law.

It’s well worth taking 45 minutes out of your day to hear Dr. F explain why the workings of nature unfold in one direction. You see, while we innately know that the future is different from the past, and so much of our conscious experience is built around the fundamental just-so-ness of time moving forward, the equations of physics describing phenomena from gravity to friction can be run in either direction without breaking the rules. Yet irreversibility is what we observe.

That’s where entropy and probability come into play. When we take into account complex systems, like the jiggles and wiggles of the uncountable atoms that make up our bodies and this chair and my coffee and our world and even out to the scale of the universe itself, there is simply a greater chance that things will become more disordered than less. It’s not that the universe can’t run in reverse, it’s just that there are so many other ways for it not to.

Or as Feynman says, nature is irreversible because of “the general accidents of life”.

This seven-part series, which Open Culture has assembled in its entirety, captures the physicist in his prime, one year before he won the Nobel Prize and became a household name. Feynman was seemingly born for the scientific stage. He had this uncanny ability to weave profound observations of the universe’s inner workings with off-the-cuff (and often brash) humor. James Gleick wrote of Feynman’s unique style and skill:

He had a mystique that came in part from sheer pragmatic brilliance–in any group of scientists he could create a dramatic impression by slashing his way through a difficult problem–and in part, too, from his personal style–rough-hewn, American, seemingly uncultivated.

This clip was a huge influence on my recent video Why Does Time Exist? Although my take scarcely measures up to Dr. Feynman, you can watch below:

(via s-c-i-guy)

June 26, 2014

June 26, 2014

studygeek said: Hi there!:) Thnx for following! Hope to get useful and for staying in touch!:)

Hey!

You’re Welcome. 

Word.

June 25, 2014

(Source: iraffiruse, via npr)

6:00pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZV9u2y1JlFoAT
  
Filed under: science 
June 25, 2014

sci-universe:

This colorized image is my tribute to astrophysicist Cecilia Payne (1900–1979), a woman who fought her way into science which was then strictly a world only for men. Cecilia discovered the chemical composition of stars and, in particular, that hydrogen and helium are the most abundant elements in stars and, therefore, in the universe. However, she is basically not credited at all with the discovery because of her male superiors.
Cecilia completed her studies at Cambridge in 1923, earning a B.A. degree in 1923. Since at that time a woman could only earn “the Title of a Degree,” she travelled to the US in 1923 to seek greater opportunities.
By the time she was awarded her PhD she had also already published six papers on stellar atmospheres, all by age 25.

Since her death in 1979, the woman who discovered what the universe is made of has not so much as received a memorial plaque. Her newspaper obituaries do not mention her greatest discovery.
Every high school student knows that Isaac Newton discovered gravity, that Charles Darwin discovered evolution, and that Albert Einstein discovered the relativity of time. But when it comes to the composition of our universe, the textbooks simply say that the most abundant atom in the universe is hydrogen. And no one ever wonders how we know.

— Jeremy Knowles, discussing the complete lack of recognition Cecilia Payne gets, even today, for her revolutionary discovery.

June 25, 2014

eerieearthling:

Spock, fighter of scientific misinformation.

(via fuckyeah-nerdery)

June 24, 2014
PIZZA ROLLIN’ ON THE CRUST^2

PIZZA ROLLIN’ ON THE CRUST^2

June 21, 2014

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers in Europe has come up with a new way to determine the gravitational constant G…the researchers instead attempted to measure the attraction between a cloud of cold rubidium atoms and tungsten weights. They came up with a value for G of 6.67191(99) x 10−11 m3 kg−1 s−2. In their paperRead more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-method-gravitational-constant.html#jCp

(Phys.org) —A team of researchers in Europe has come up with a new way to determine the gravitational constant G…the researchers instead attempted to measure the attraction between a cloud of cold rubidium atoms and tungsten weights. They came up with a value for G of 6.67191(99) x 10−11 m3 kg−1 s−2. In their paper

Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2014-06-method-gravitational-constant.html#jCp

6:00am  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZV9u2y1JJjiEj
Filed under: science physics G constant g G 
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